The “Start Up Boost bolus” is a completely new approach to prevent milking disease. The solution for the calcium and any phosphorus deficiency should come from the cow herself, so that she can provide herself with the correct calcium and phosphorus levels even during the extreme peaks around calving.

This solution is now available in the form of calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol glycoside). Calcitriol is extracted from dried leaves of Solanum glaucophylum. Calcitriol ensures that the animal can keep the calcium level at the right level in different ways:

  • The cow can get more calcium and phosphorus from the feed
  • The cow has a lower calcium excretion via urine
  • The cow can release more calcium from its own bone system

Agriprom has developed a bolus in cooperation with a veterinarian that contains calcitriol. This bolus is administered two days before the expected calf moment and delivers calcitriol to the cow over a ten-day period. This allows the cow to raise the level of calcium in the blood from its own metabolism. The efficacy of calcitriol for use in dairy cows against dairy disease is endorsed, among other things, in an EFSA report (European food safety authority). The patented Start up boost bolus is marketed by Agriprom and is available exclusively from Agriprom dealers.

Advantages

  • Calcitriol stimulates its own metabolism to increase the level of calcium and phosphorus in the blood
  • The cow can get more calcium and phosphorus from blood itself
  • The cow has a lower calcium excretion via urine
  • The cow can release more calcium from its own bottling system 10 days after administration
  • Only 1 bolus per treatment required

Active substances: Calcitriol

Dosage

Administer 1 bolus two days before the expected calving time using a suitable bolus applicator.

Packaging

70 grams per bolus, 8 boluses per box

Patented product

Innovation Award at the SPACE

Agriprom has won the innovation prize for its Start Up Boost Bolus at the Space exhibtion in Rennes (France). The jury was impressed by the new approach to calcium deficiency in dairy cattle.